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Truth is a perspective, provided its "interested.

Apart from all this Zizek, by examining Bataille, has a great bit on transgression, that cuddly thing, is not longer effective when the Father tells you not only to enjoy yourself like a capitalist hedonist, but to tell you how it "went" afterwards--such is the society we are living today. The true way forward would involve escaping from the law of transgression or a romance of the "moment" of rupture, and realize the Law for what it is--that which intervenes, destabilizes, and is essentially excessive.

This echoes what I have heard Zizek remind his readers time and time again--sure, we know about revolution--but what about the morning after? I plead ignorant on matters of Theology, and on most things, as a matter of fact but this was an incredible journey, nevertheless. View all 4 comments. May 24, Ryan Rebel rated it really liked it Shelves: reviewed. Zizek is hilarious. People call him a rock star philosopher.

My first exposure to him was a YouTube video in which he, twitchy and sweaty, monologued about shit. Take that literally. Zizek is a bit like Foucault in his approach, in that he jumps around talking about whatever he's interested in--and just so happens to be an expert in all of it. His arguments are a good deal more tethered that foucault's, though, so that's a plus. The Puppet and the Dwarf is all about the secret ideology of Zizek is hilarious.

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The Puppet and the Dwarf is all about the secret ideology of Christianity, or in Zizek's words, the perverse core. He makes arguments like, "What if God became Christ not because we were so inferior, but because he was jealous of our mortality? The problem is that these arguments are enticing, and I want to be able to share and think about them, but Zizek's mind is so complex that I lost the ability to capture and communicate the points of his book almost immediately after I finished reading it. So that's a bummer.

It doesn't help that the dude is incredibly unfocused. That characteristic makes for some great tangents about movies, candy, advertisements, pop culture in general, Nietzsche, etc. But if you want to have your mind blown and not be sure exactly why afterwards, this is the book for you. Zizek is getting at something real and insane here, in his own eclectic way.

Also, the book jacket author photo alone is well worth the price of admission. Feb 14, Will C rated it it was amazing. Zizek is a controversial theorist of literature, film, and pop-culture whose areas of expertise range from rigorous philosophy, through political science, and most interestingly, Lacanian psychoanalysis. This book, which is both very technical and unusually readable, reads like an interdisciplinary discussion on theology viewed through every conceivable lens.

He looks at theology through the eyes of Hegel, Lacan, and Marx and finds an intrinsic "subversive" core at the center of Christian Zizek is a controversial theorist of literature, film, and pop-culture whose areas of expertise range from rigorous philosophy, through political science, and most interestingly, Lacanian psychoanalysis. He looks at theology through the eyes of Hegel, Lacan, and Marx and finds an intrinsic "subversive" core at the center of Christian thought.

The author's aim is to argue that: "not merely [ Throughout the book, he uses elaborate "chunks" of theory to prove his point, and uses illustrations from pop culture not just to back up his arguments, but also to make allot of the more esoteric theory Hegel's dialectical view of reality is carried to the limit here, and Lacan is often incomprehensible unless you know the specific sense in which he uses normal words and are familiar with his neologisms accessible to any reader who enjoys thinking.

The most frustrating thing about Zizek, as far as his critics are concerned, is the extent to which he takes previous thinkers out of context, and the extent to which he reads against the text. In this book, it's apparent that he does these things knowingly, half jokingly, and often with mind-blowing results. Although the points made about theology and the phenomenon of belief in general are intriguing, and worth reading the book for, the best part for me was watching the author's subversive thought process in action: starting with sources that are ostensibly diametrically opposed to his thesis and abstracting the intellectual gems specific "patterns of thought," so to speak from their content, and using them to subvert their authors and advance his own thesis.

The result feels like a strange mix of entertaining pop-philosophy and the Socratic Method. After reading this book a couple times, I feel like I have a stronger understanding of many of the thinkers he cites. As for his thesis, it is an interesting perspective, and I think anyone who is interested in religion in general should read it if only for the points he makes about the nature of belief and the structure of religious morality.

Feb 02, Justin rated it really liked it. I want to give this 5 stars, because, like all or at least many Zizek books, it is eminently intellectually vast and poignant in the most fascinating ways and eminently entertaining as well. What Zizek lacks is the rigor of some of his intellectual forebears; I'm thinking about Hegel here.

The Puppet and the Dwarf: The Perverse Core of Christianity

While Hegel was never easy to read by almost anyone's standards, one thing he never lacked was rigor and structure. This book, like all of Zizek's books, feels like a tidal wave of learning and erudition I want to give this 5 stars, because, like all or at least many Zizek books, it is eminently intellectually vast and poignant in the most fascinating ways and eminently entertaining as well. This book, like all of Zizek's books, feels like a tidal wave of learning and erudition blasting you from all corners.


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But, after thinking about it some, one is hard-pressed to put one's finger on the "real point" of the book. This is due in part to the fact that to really understand Zizek's argument s , one must have a certain working knowledge of, at the very least Lacan, and ideally Hegel as well as Kant and throw Schelling and Adorno and Horkheimer yes, a strange triad in for good measure.

This is, of course, not something easy to come by. But, even with said knowlege, Zizek's books feel like stories without a real climax, or perhaps with many climaxes. On the last page of this book, Zizek writes, "The real point of this book is. The problem is that pretty much every book he writes sort of feels like this. If Zizek would have opted for some of the rigor of Hegel at the expense of becoming a bit more boring of a writer, I'd take it. Zizek is well into his writing career and it is clear that these sort of stream-of-consciousness books without clear connections from one chapter to another is something that is going to stop.

I'm sure his publishers will print whatever he tosses on their desk. And I will continue to read Zizek with both affection and awe. View 1 comment. Jan 20, Beverly rated it really liked it. I'm still reading Zizek but I can't wait until I'm finished to comment a little. I was enthralled with his energy and passion. Also, how comfortable he was to be himself.


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I didn't see his eccentric habits as contrived. I've just started reading this book, but I appreciate Zizek's courage to put his ideas out there even if they're not completely thought-through I'm still reading Zizek but I can't wait until I'm finished to comment a little. I've just started reading this book, but I appreciate Zizek's courage to put his ideas out there even if they're not completely thought-through yet, because he leads you into new territory. Whether I end up agreeing with his ideas or not, he incites a rebellious spirit in me to venture beyond what's already been thought about.

This, I believe, is what a philosopher should be doing; leading the way into unexplored thought. I'm looking for others who have something to say about his work since I'm new to it. So far the responses I've got in person are simply one that consisted of mostly laughter and another that was "WOW!

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View 2 comments. Jun 15, Everett rated it it was amazing. This book was so good, I began reading it again from the beginning as soon as I finished. I'm really glad I had tackled In Defense of Lost Causes first, since it prepared me with the lingo and some of the Lacanian basics. Many of the points made in fact, some of the same sentences from "Lost Causes" appeared first in "Puppet and the Dwarf. Not exactly hostile to my religion of Christianity This book was so good, I began reading it again from the beginning as soon as I finished.

Not exactly hostile to my religion of Christianity the "perverse" of the title is not the same as "perverted" , it nevertheless diverges irreconcilably from my own beliefs around chapter 7. But what a wild ride until that point! Definitely got me to look at Paul in a new light.

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Sep 17, Dr. Lloyd E. Campbell rated it liked it. Immediately after reading this book I read it again. This week I finished reading it for the third time. I don't have the prerequisite knowledge to truly understand this book. I think I'll read his book on Lacan since Lacan seems to be the person who has influenced him the most. Why did I read this book three times while mastering perhaps half the ideas in the book?

What I do understand is profound, entertaining and thought provoking. Some day, unless I run out of time, I'll try again to Immediately after reading this book I read it again. Some day, unless I run out of time, I'll try again to understand this author.

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Jan 27, Jeffrey rated it it was amazing Shelves: philosophy , religion. Mind melting philosophy.

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Apr 18, Nasha added it. His Hegelian reflection on religion is not what i got after reading the lecture of the phil of history. May 17, Jared Colley rated it really liked it Shelves: philosophycriticaltheory , religiousstudies. Another perplexing work by Zizek. Here, he tackles the topic of Christianity, but he has no interest in the "otherworldly" - he is a materialist through and through.


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Like many recent European philosophers Badiou, Agamben, Taubes , Zizek is re-appropriating Christianity for progressive, political purposes. He sees Paul and his circle more as revolutionaries than as apostles of a new religion. The truth of the matter is that they were both, but Zizek concerns himself with the political. This work Another perplexing work by Zizek. This work also engages Jacques Lacan which I guess is unsurprising since he calls himself a "card carrying Lacanian". I struggled with this book, but mostly because I struggle with Lacan.

In fact, I really don't get Lacan at all; his writing frustrates me. Log-in or create an account first!